research: Working Groups

The “working group” concept is critical to the long-term success and vibrancy of the BSi. This interdisciplinary collaborative effort encourages thinking outside of traditional channels, processes and systems. In the past few years this has proven to consistently produce innovative and creative research proposals with the potential for high impact in the field.  

A new idea was needed to advance research for the next big break through and the speed in which it goes from bench to bedside. This led to creating a model that truly makes the research a joint effort across campus.

Historically, departmental and geographic barriers restricted scientists from having the opportunity to meet, discuss or learn what peer research was going on in other departments across campus and disciplines. Opening the doors to other laboratories within our university so research could evolve was the next logical step.

Working group meetings are monthly and open to all of Johns Hopkins faculty and staff. Scientists present their latest research and open it to peer review. These discussions have spun off novel research avenues and larger group efforts. Working groups topics come from suggestions by any JHU researcher, conferences or other collaborative events, vetted through BSi leadership.  We encourage new neuroscience topic areas that would be enhanced by a collaborative effort across JHU.  

In addition to creating this new forum for scientist to work together, BSi offers funding avenues for this innovative research. From these working groups, BSi awarded research grants which in turn have received funding from outside agencies. The initial research ideas needed seed money to advance far enough to submit successful scientific grant proposals. 

View the upcoming working group topics and dates in the News & Events section

To learn more about joining a working group or have an idea for a new one, please contact Barbara Smith


New Brain Activity Map Working Group

The BSi Working Group on the "Brain Activity Map" addresses the new NIH BRAIN Initiative (see http://www.whitehouse.gov/infographics/brain-initiative).

Specifically, we focus on methods and techniques to measure brain activity and connectivity using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We would like to bring together neuroscientists, engineers, computer scientists, mathematicians and nanotechnologists to discuss new methods of analysis and we especially encourage members of the School of Engineering and the School of Arts and Sciences to participate in this working group. We started with an organizational meeting and then have had select talks from laboratories across the University. The goal is to establish novel collaborations and interactions to address the Brain Activity Map and to apply for funding in this area in the future.

Are you submitting an application for the NIH BRAIN INITITATIVE RFA's?
Let us know the title of your grant and participants.  We are trying to keep track of these grants and also have people give talks at future Working Group Meetings about their research proposals.
(http://www.nih.gov/science/brain/funding.htm).
Please contact bsmith13@jhmi.edu with title and participants

Coordinators:
Jin Kang, the Director of the Electrical Engineering Department
Daniel O'Connor, Assistant Professor in the Department of Neuroscience and the Brain Science Institute
Steve Hsiao, Professor in the Department of Neuroscience and the Mind Brain Institute

 


Examples of the other working groups and the departments involved: 

Autism
  Pediatrics
Neurology
Epidemiology
Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
Institute of Genetic Medicine
Kennedy Krieger Institute
  
Blood brain barrier and cerebral vasculature initiative
Learn more about this working group
  Neurology
Radiology
Pharmacology
Medicine
Physics
Lieber Institute
Biomedical  Engineering
Materials Science
Psychiatry
Oncology
Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
  
Computational neuroscience
  Neuroscience
Neurology
Mind Brain Institute
Psychiatry
    
Macro imaging, education
  Neurology
Radiology
Biological Chemistry
Molecular Biology and Genetics
Biomedical Engineering
    
Memory mechanisms and synapses
  Neuroscience
Pathology
Neurology
Biostatistics
Psychological and Brain Sciences
Psychiatry
    
Music and sound
  Peabody
Neurology
Otolaryngology
Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality
Neuroscience
    
Neural regeneration
  Neurology
Orthopeaedics
Radiology
Neurosurgery
Neuroscience
Psychiatry
Biomedical Engineering
Kennedy Krieger Institute
Mind Brain Institute
Applied Physics Laboratory
Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
Psychological and Brain Sciences
     
Pain
   Neurosurgery
Neurology
Biological Chemistry
Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
Otolaryngology
      
Science of the arts
  Neurology
Walters Art Museum
Psychiatry
Peabody
Cognitive Science
Neuroscience
Otolaryngology
Psychological and Brain Sciences
Mind Brain Institute
School of Education
School of Public Health
Molecular Biology and Genetics
Kennedy Krieger Institute
  
Synapse in cognition and cognitive disorders
  Neurology
Psychiatry
Neuroscience
Pathology
Radiology
Biological Chemistry
      
Traumatic brain injury
  Radiology
Neurology
Pathology
Anesthesiology
Nuclear Medicine
Surgery
Neuroscience
Neurosurgery
Pediatrics
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Biostatistics
Psychiatry
Applied Physics Laboratory
Biomedical Engineering
Kennedy Krieger Institute
Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
     
Visual and auditory perception
   Neurology
Psychiatry
Neuroscience
Otolaryngology
Biomedical Engineering
School of Education
Mind Brain Institute
 
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