cores: The High Throughput Screening Center for Neurogenetics
The High Throughput Screening Center for Neurogenetics

Min Li, M.D., with the assistance of Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D., oversees an institutional core facility that uses robotic equipment and personnel to perform high throughput screens with small molecules such as drugs and chemicals. This facility will extend these capabilities to testing genes (cDNA’s) and gene blockers (shRNA’s) in the same high throughput fashion.  These capabilities will allow Johns Hopkins University neuroscience investigators to conduct tests in a dish, allowing them to rapidly identify the roles of specific genes in brain cells.
High Throughput Biology - HIT Center

Investigators
Min Li, M.D.
Min Li, M.D. is currently a Professor of Neuroscience and co-Director of High Throughput Biology (HIT) Center. He oversees the Johns Hopkins compound screening facility. Dr. Min Li received his Ph.D. degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and postdoctoral training from University of California San Francisco. Before returning to Johns Hopkins as a faculty member, he worked at Affymax Research Institute, the biotech company pioneered in gene-chip technology. The research in Dr. Li’s lab is focused on the biogenesis, regulation and pharmacology of ion channels and receptors that are critical for sensing and transduction of pain. He has received a number of faculty awards. His technical expertise includes extensive experience and knowledge for designing and managing high throughput screening experiments and analyses.  Dr. Li can be reached by email at minli@jhmi.edu or by phone 410-614-5131.
 
Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D.
Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and an Assistant Investigator in both the Center High-Throughput Biology (HIT) Center and the Institute for Cell Engineering (ICE). He received his Ph.D. degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School. His lab is focused on identifying molecular pathways involved in the development and survival of specific neuronal subtypes in the mammalian retina and hypothalamus, and actively seeks to apply novel high-throughput screening technologies to this question. He has received numerous awards, including the W. M. Keck Foundation Distinguished Young Scholar in Medial Research Award, the Klingenstein Fellowship, the Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Award, and Ruth and Milton Steinbach Fund Award for Research in Macular Degeneration. His technical expertise includes extensive experience with high-throughput approaches to analyzing gene expression and medium-throughput screens in primary neuronal cells aimed at characterizing the function of genes identified using these approaches.  Dr. Blackshaw can be reached by email at sblack@jhmi.edu or by phone 443-287-5609.

High Throughput Application

 
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